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Microbiology and Immunology Track Faculty

The primary department of each Microbiology and Immunology track faculty member is listed.

Jon Blevins, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
We study the pathogenesis of the Borrelia spirochetes that cause Lyme disease and relapsing fever

Sarah Blossom, PhD
Pediatrics
Web profile
Developmental exposure to environmental toxicants in a mouse model and understanding mechanisms of exposures on immune system, neurodevelopment, and behavior

Karl Boehme, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
My laboratory studies mechanisms of reovirus pathogenesis.

Nalini Bora, PhD
Ophthalmology
My research is focused upon the understanding of biochemical, immunological, molecular and genetic mechanisms of various ocular diseases such as autoimmune uveitis and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Paul Drew, PhD
Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences
Web profile
Neuroimmunology

Craig Forrest, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Virology, cancer biology, immunology! Gammaherpesviruses are cancer-causing viruses that infect the majority of humans. We are working to define functions of viral proteins in infection and disease, identify host factors that block viral infection and prevent virus-driven cancers, and understand immune responses to chronic viral infections. Our major goal is to comprehend the complex relationship between gammaherpesviruses and their hosts. PLUS, we get to do cool science and figure out how stuff works!

Aime Franco, PhD
Physiology and Biophysics
Web profile
In the Franco laboratory we are investigating the role of oncogenes, hormones and microbes in the development of cancer.  We use a variety of mouse models complemented with in vitro cell models to better understand initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer.

Kathleen Gilbert, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Role of environmental toxicants in triggering autoimmune diseases

En Huang, PhD
Environmental and Occupational Health
Web profile
The main theme of my research is to discover and develop antimicrobial peptides (e.g., bacteriocins and lipopeptides). These antimicrobial agents have the potential to be used as natural food preservatives, animal feed additives or novel antibiotics against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

Chia Lee, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Molecular pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus

Hong-yu Li, PhD
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research interests include drug discovery of targeted therapeutics focusing on Single Agent Poly-pharmacology (SAP), drug discovery research for “non-druggable” targets, and development of a kinase fragment library and novel synthetic methodologies for accelerating the drug discovery process.

Lin-Xi Li, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Adaptive immunity to Chlamydia female reproductive tract infection

Jia Liu, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
The Liu lab studies host intrinsic innate signaling using poxvirus as probing tool. We also engineer poxviruses for immunotherapy of cancer such as ovarian cancer.

Vladimir Lupashin, PhD
Physiology and Biophysics
Web profile
My laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the generation and maintenance of intra-cellular membrane-bounded compartments. In all eukaryotic cells intracellular membrane trafficking is critical for a range of important cellular functions including protein secretion, post-translational modifications, cell signalling, cell polarization, and cell maintenance. Defects in membrane trafficking can underline, or even exacerbate, a number of human diseases including cancer, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s, cystic fibrosis, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation.

Philip Mayeux, PhD
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Web profile
Acute renal failure is a frequent and serious complication of septic shock in humans. My research is focused on the study of animal models of renal injury associated with sepsis. Studies are directed toward understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms triggered by sepsis that lead to cellular injury and organ failure. Our primary interests are in understanding the development of oxidant stress caused by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as mediators of renal injury and evaluating new therapeutic approaches to prevent renal injury or accelerate recovery.

Richard Morrison, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Current researched is aimed at defining immune responses that protect against sexually transmitted Chlamydia infection.  Specifically, we have shown that CD4+ T cells and antibody confer immunity to genital infection in the murine model of infection.  Our current studies are aimed at defining the precise mechanisms by which those responses protect, and determining if similar mechanisms function against human chlamydial infection.

Mayumi Nakagawa, PhD
Pathology
Cell-mediated immunity against human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV therapeutic vaccine development, cancer immunotherapy

Roger Pechous, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Our laboratory is interested in understanding the pathogenesis of pulmonary infection with Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague.  We seek to characterize the host/pathogen interactions responsible for disease progression, and to define the mechanisms and effects of inflammation-mediated pulmonary damage that occur during infection.

Steven Post, PhD
Pathology
We are interested in understanding the mechanisms by which scavenger receptors regulate macrophage function in chronic inflammatory disease.

Mark Smeltzer, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Bacteriology, microbial pathogenesis, Staphylococcus aureus infection, orthopedic infection

Jason Stumhofer, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
The protozoan parasite Plasmodium is the causative agent of malaria, which remains one of the most prominent public health challenges in the world today. My laboratory is interested in determining how protective antibody responses are generated and maintained in mice after Plasmodium infection, so that we can utilize this information to understand why antibody-mediated immunity is slow to develop in humans. Specifically, we are interested in understanding how memory B cells are generated and maintained after Plasmodium infection, and whether heterogeneity within the memory B cell pool contributes to functional diversity in a secondary infection.

David Ussery, PhD
Biomedical Informatics
We are using ‘third generation sequencing technology’ (such as Oxford Nanopore flow cells) to do metagenomics of clinical isolates and environmental samples.

Daniel Voth, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
Coxiella burnetii interaction with human macrophages

V.Laxmi Yeruva, PhD
Pediatrics
Web profile
1. Our research focuses on health-oriented basic and translational studies of immunity. The goal of our studies is to understand the factors that differentiate breast-feeding and formula-feeding in terms of immune system and gut functions later in life. 2. Our lab also studies the chlamydial immunopathogenesis working towards biomarkers to predict the upper tract disease in mouse and clinical studies.

Kevin Young, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
My lab works on bacterial cell wall synthesis, bacterial cell division, and the generation of bacterial morphology.

Xuming Zhang, PhD
Microbiology and Immunology
Web profile
The molecular biology of coronavirus and influenza virus, viral entry and replication, virus-host cell interaction and pathogenesis, viral vaccine and antiviral drug.

Haibo Zhao, MD, PhD
Internal Medicine/Endocrinology
Osteoclast cell biology and metabolic bone diseases

Boris Zybaylov
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
I am interested in the role of non-canonical DNA structures and long non-coding RNAs in human disease. I am also interested in clinical applications of microbiome-derived protein biomarkers